Document details for 'Sodium hyperaccumulators in the Caryophyllales are characterized by both abnormally large shoot sodium concentrations and [Na]shoot/[Na]root quotients greater than unity'

Authors Neugebauer, K, Broadley, M.R., El-Serehy, H.A., George, T.S., Graham, N.S., Thompson, J.A., Wright, G. and White, P.J.
Publication details Annals of Botany 129(1), 65-78. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
Publisher details Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Keywords Angiosperm, Caryophyllales, evolution, ionome, matK phylogeny, mineral composition, shoot and root partitioning, sodium (Na) hyperaccumulation
Abstract Background and Aims Some Caryophyllales species accumulate abnormally large shoot sodium (Na) concentrations in non-saline environments. It is not known whether this is a consequence of altered Na partitioning between roots and shoots. This paper tests the hypotheses (1) that Na concentrations in shoots ([Na]shoot) and in roots ([Na]root) are positively correlated among Caryophyllales, and (2) that shoot Na hyperaccumulation is correlated with [Na]shoot/[Na]root quotients. Methods Fifty two genotypes, representing 45 Caryophyllales species and 4 species from other angiosperm orders, were grown hydroponically in a non-saline, complete nutrient solution. Concentrations of Na in shoots and in roots were determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Key Results Sodium concentrations in shoots and roots were not correlated among Caryophyllales species with normal [Na]shoot, but were positively correlated among Caryophyllales species with abnormally large [Na]shoot. In addition, Caryophyllales species with abnormally large [Na]shoot had greater [Na]shoot/[Na]root than Caryophyllales species with normal [Na]shoot. Conclusions Sodium hyperaccumulators in the Caryophyllales are characterized by abnormally large [Na]shoot, a positive correlation between [Na]shoot and [Na]root, and [Na]shoot/[Na]root quotients greater than unity.
Last updated 2022-02-17
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  1. Neugebauer_2022_accepted.pdf
Links
  1. Journal link
    https://academic.oup.com/aob/article/129/1/65/6381089?login=true#326252454
  2. DOI
    https://doi.org/10.1093/aob/mcab126

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